17 results found for Bite-sized lectures

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How diet can improve teen health

Good nutrition and a 'healthy food environment' are vital for development and the creation of healthy habits to set young people up for a healthy life, explains Senior Lecturer (Human Nutrition), Dr Anita Lawrence in this bite-sized lecture.

We can prevent pandemics with wildlife disease surveillance

Our health is intrinsically connected with animal health. COVID-19 is the latest in a long list of diseases, known as zoonoses or zoonotic diseases, that are carried and spread to us from animals. In fact, 60 per cent of emerging human infectious diseases originate in animal populations.

10 reasons to doubt the United States of America is in political decline

Amid a global pandemic, economic struggle and election chaos, can the United States of America maintain its status as a political superpower on the world stage? Associate Dean (International) for the Faculty of Arts and Associate Professor in American Politics Tim Lynch gives us 10 reasons why this isn’t the end for the star-spangled banner.

How we keep our cells happy

With the survival of our cells being essential to the survival of our bodies, it pays to keep them happy. Find out how from Dr Charles Sevigny, lecturer in the Bachelor of Biomedicine.

Why we remake: the politics, economics and emotions of remakes

Ever wondered if Hollywood has run out of original ideas? Dr Lauren Rosewarne, a lecturer in the Bachelor of Arts, explains why film and television remakes are taking over our screens in this bite-sized lecture.

Storytelling and the art of persuasion

The power of storytelling doesn’t end in childhood and brands know it. Dr Danielle Chmielewski-Raimondo, lecturer in the Bachelor of Commerce, explains why stories are so important to marketing in this bite-sized lecture.

Cultural burning and the Australian landscape

Associate Professor Michael-Shawn Fletcher, lecturer in the Bachelor of Science, explains the history and impact of cultural burning, and the importance of this long standing tradition as part of Australian landscape management.
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