Coursework

Master of Clinical Rehabilitation

The experience

Overview

Online learning

As a student at a school committed to professional, continuing and executive education, you’ll have access to high-quality online education tools – all you need is a computer and an internet connection.

Your virtual classroom is academically robust and designed to prepare you for competition in your field. You will expand your skills and knowledge via innovative technologies like webinars, podcasts and moderated discussion forums.

Why study online?

The online learning environment has been carefully devised by expert academics, alongside learning designers and technology specialists, to facilitate an interactive and flexible student experience.

At the University of Melbourne, you will have access to the best minds and a dynamic peer group. Throughout the course you will be able to engage closely with fellow online students and share your knowledge with each other.

Gain access to the highest levels of support

From your initial expression of interest right through to graduation, you’ll receive all the technical support you need.

Don’t be surprised if you learn our student support team members by name – they are dedicated, personal and friendly and they understand that every student experience is unique. If a challenge arises, they’ll do everything in their power to assist you so that you can continue to have an excellent learning experience.

Our online student support consultants can assist with:

  • Enrolment and subject assistance
  • Administrative logistics and fee options
  • Technical support, regular health checks, and technical support during live webinars
  • Online learning skills and workload management
  • Special circumstances.
Who you will learn from
  • Associate Professor Jennifer McGinley, Head Physiotherapy Department, Course Coordinator, Master of Clinical Rehabilitation, Subject Development Coordinator, Foundations of Clinical Rehabilitation
  • Associate Professor Louisa Remedios, Director of Teaching and Learning, Physiotherapy Department, Course Development Coordinator, Master of Clinical Rehabilitation
  • Associate Professor Alicia Spittle, Deputy Head Physiotherapist Department and Subject Development Coordinator, Rehabilitation in Paediatrics
  • Professor Linda Denehy, Head School of Health Sciences, Expert contributor Rehabilitation in the Acute Setting
  • Dr Sonya Moore, Subject Development Coordinator, Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation
  • Associate Professor Gavin Williams, Associate Professor of Physiotherapy Rehabilitation
  • Dr Margaret Sherburn, Subject Development Coordinator, Rehabilitation for Women’s Health
  • Dr Selina Parry, Subject Development Coordinator, Rehabilitation in the Acute Setting.
Profile

Boon Chong Kwok

"I hope to transform healthcare delivery in Singapore."

Boon Chong Kwok is a physiotherapist with over 10 years’ experience and he’s now channelling that experience into his own private practice which he recently launched in Singapore. The 35-year-old describes his role as a physiotherapist with great enthusiasm stating, “it is an exciting job getting people well, and all cheered up.”

Previously having worked as the Head of Physiotherapy at the Thye Hua Kwan Moral Charities, a volunteer organisation, as well as at the Singapore Institute of Technology as an Adjunct Lecturer, he is relishing his studies and sees it an opportunity to revise his previous work in research.

“The knowledge acquired from the courses such as a critical appraisal of literature has been an excellent revision to my previous work in research. The institution has a wide range of access to e-books and e-journals to enhance my knowledge base.”

But his vision for the future is much grander – with plans to leave a legacy as a health care practitioner.

"I hope to lead and transform healthcare delivery in Singapore, with Physiotherapist [being] an important gatekeeper in primary care."

For the ambitious physiotherapist, another stand-out feature about his online learning journey is the “open communication and respectful culture in the university (the whole academia).” He says they “are two important characteristics that I find important in life.”

Without a moment’s hesitation, Boon says he would recommend the course to Physiotherapists such as himself who are interested in expanding and growing their health care skills.

“I would encourage them to take up the course if they are looking at blended learning and self-controlled pace of post-graduate education.”